Stamp Out Stigma


"Multiple studies have also shown that the major cause of this stigma is the perception that some individuals with mental illnesses are dangerous. Given this fact, it seems self-evident that stigma will not be decreased until we decrease violent behavior committed by mentally ill persons, and this can only be done by ensuring that they receive treatment."

Stigma: Violence by seriously mentally ill persons is its major cause”  (via agoraphobichousewife)

WHAT. THE. HELL?!?!?!

NO. So much no about this.

Let’s NOT blame people suffering from mental illness with the stigma that they have to endure every day. Mentally ill people are not the ones committing the vast majority of violent offences! 

  • “Although studies suggest a link between mental illnesses and violence, the contribution of people with mental illnesses to overall rates of violence is small” (Institute of Medicine, 2006)
  • “the magnitude of the relationship is greatly exaggerated in the minds of the general population” (Institute of Medicine, 2006)
  • “Research has shown that the vast majority of people who are violent do not suffer from mental illnesses (American Psychiatric Association, 1994).”
  • “… [T]he absolute risk of violence among the mentally ill as a group is still very small and … only a small proportion of the violence in our society can be attributed to persons who are mentally ill (Mulvey, 1994).”

Increasing availability of treatment will not reduce stigma - REDUCING STIGMA INCREASES THE AVAILABILITY OF TREATMENT. 

Instead of enforcing treatment, maybe we should stop the media sensationalising any crimes committed by someone dealing with mental illness.

Maybe stopping bullshit like this will help reduce stigma.

Maybe educating on people on the fact that people with psychiatric disabilities are far more likely to be victims than perpetrators of violent crime (Appleby, et al., 2001) will help reduce stigma.

ENFORCING TREATMENT AND TELLING PEOPLE WITH MENTAL ILLNESS THAT THEY’RE THE PROBLEM WILL NOT REDUCE STIGMA.

EDUCATION IS WHAT REDUCES STIGMA.

(via tedbunny)

(via tedbunny)

— 6 months ago with 44 notes
tedbunny:

thoughtsofallie:

I think this may be a sign that there’s something wrong with the way schools teach

Okay, I’ve seen this floating around my dash a few times and I’m currently scouring the internet to find the peer reviewed paper or meta-analysis that this has come from, but in all honesty it just seems to be a random, impressive sounding soundbite that Robert Leahy randomly came up with. Now, if someone can find me the study where Dr. Leahy managed to compare anxiety scores of high school students with a set of reliable and valid scores of 1950’s patients I will be more than happy to take a step back and say ‘yes, he was right.’
But lets think critically for a second:
Do not get me wrong - there is an apparent issue with the education system in the US, there is no denying that. The anxiety levels are far too high, the pressure is a lot. But the real problem I take here is the comparison with 1950’s psychiatric institutions.
Yes, there is peer pressure, bullying, exam pressure, discrimination and a whole host of things that young people - going through puberty - have to deal with. It’s not ideal, in the slightest, but have you any idea what psychiatric institutions were like in the 1950’s?
Firstly, to be committed to a psychiatric institution you probably suffered from a mental illness to begin with. That’s not going to do wonders for your anxiety levels, especially if it’s an anxiety disorder…. or a paranoid psychotic disorder. These are clinically pathological levels of anxiety to begin with… which resulted in hospitalisation.
Now, even without the obvious presence of mental illness or other disability, or even the fact that these people were detained, frequently against their will, in an unfamiliar environment, psychiatric institutions of the 1950’s were not like they are today. Psychosurgery was still allowed, Thorazine had literally only just been synthesised and it was only really introduced in 1955. The shift towards psychopharmacology, as opposed to psychosurgery, was happening during this time. And while Thorazine was a huge step forward it wasn’t exactly always a pleasant experience.
In Britain the first mental health act didn’t come into effect until 1959. In America JFK signed a Mental Health Study Act to reform the mental health system because of his personal experience - his sister had undergone a frontal lobotomy. It wasn’t until 1963 that he asked for new Mental Health legislation because of the incredibly harsh conditions that the patients were living in. 
And even then, regardless of the state of the mental health system in the 1950’s, even now - in the modern day - psychiatric hospitals aren’t always pleasant places. I have worked with people who suffer flash backs and PTSD symptoms, on top of their other mental health issues, because of their time spent inpatient.
I’m sorry, school sucks, yes, the education system needs a total overhaul. But I will not believe that it is at all comparable to a 1950’s psychiatric hospital until someone shows me reliable peer-reviewed data.

tedbunny:

thoughtsofallie:

I think this may be a sign that there’s something wrong with the way schools teach

Okay, I’ve seen this floating around my dash a few times and I’m currently scouring the internet to find the peer reviewed paper or meta-analysis that this has come from, but in all honesty it just seems to be a random, impressive sounding soundbite that Robert Leahy randomly came up with. Now, if someone can find me the study where Dr. Leahy managed to compare anxiety scores of high school students with a set of reliable and valid scores of 1950’s patients I will be more than happy to take a step back and say ‘yes, he was right.’

But lets think critically for a second:

Do not get me wrong - there is an apparent issue with the education system in the US, there is no denying that. The anxiety levels are far too high, the pressure is a lot. But the real problem I take here is the comparison with 1950’s psychiatric institutions.

Yes, there is peer pressure, bullying, exam pressure, discrimination and a whole host of things that young people - going through puberty - have to deal with. It’s not ideal, in the slightest, but have you any idea what psychiatric institutions were like in the 1950’s?

Firstly, to be committed to a psychiatric institution you probably suffered from a mental illness to begin with. That’s not going to do wonders for your anxiety levels, especially if it’s an anxiety disorder…. or a paranoid psychotic disorder. These are clinically pathological levels of anxiety to begin with… which resulted in hospitalisation.

Now, even without the obvious presence of mental illness or other disability, or even the fact that these people were detained, frequently against their will, in an unfamiliar environment, psychiatric institutions of the 1950’s were not like they are today. Psychosurgery was still allowed, Thorazine had literally only just been synthesised and it was only really introduced in 1955. The shift towards psychopharmacology, as opposed to psychosurgery, was happening during this time. And while Thorazine was a huge step forward it wasn’t exactly always a pleasant experience.

In Britain the first mental health act didn’t come into effect until 1959. In America JFK signed a Mental Health Study Act to reform the mental health system because of his personal experience - his sister had undergone a frontal lobotomy. It wasn’t until 1963 that he asked for new Mental Health legislation because of the incredibly harsh conditions that the patients were living in. 

And even then, regardless of the state of the mental health system in the 1950’s, even now - in the modern day - psychiatric hospitals aren’t always pleasant places. I have worked with people who suffer flash backs and PTSD symptoms, on top of their other mental health issues, because of their time spent inpatient.

I’m sorry, school sucks, yes, the education system needs a total overhaul. But I will not believe that it is at all comparable to a 1950’s psychiatric hospital until someone shows me reliable peer-reviewed data.

(Source: lover-gem)

— 7 months ago with 399079 notes
http://maccadamia-nut.tumblr.com/post/70275883671/ok-ok-i-hate-when-people-use-their-mental →

stufftheysaytodepressedpeople:

maccadamia-nut:

Ok ok I hate when people use their mental illnesses as an excuse to not do anything. Like I have plenty of these issues but that doesn’t mean I’m going to sit on my ass complaining about how unfair it is that I’m being forced to do something that makes me uncomfortable, because HEAVEN FORBID I GET…

This person here is giving us a good example of the concept of Everyone Recovers Differently. While their method of stepping out of their comfort zone may have worked for them, they are failing to see that it may not necessarily work for everyone else. Friendly reminder to all my friends and followers out there: just because you recovered in a certain way doesn’t mean everyone else can also recover in that same way. And just because you recovered in a certain way, doesn’t give you the right to force that method on everyone else and then get mad when it doesn’t work.

(Source: williamshatnerds)

— 8 months ago with 188 notes

Stop Stigma Sacramento
The Mental Illness: It’s not always what you think project was initiated by Sacramento County Department of Health and Human Services’ Division of Behavioral Health Services to:
-Reduce stigma and discrimination
-Promote mental health and wellness
-Inspire hope for people and families living with mental illness

Stop Stigma Sacramento is one of the many projects here working to support those with mental illnesses. These are all over the county—on billboards, community boards, and gas pumps.

For mental health resources in the county, visit the NAMI Sacramento website

(Source: amyleona, via gulpereel)

— 8 months ago with 34117 notes

tedbunny:

221bitssmallerontheoutside:

breathe-baozi-breathe:

shitborderlinesdo:

geekgirlsmash:

Actual Suicide Prevention

(Source 1, Source 2)

Not sure if this was posted already, but I thought it’d be useful.

~Alex

this is the most important thing that I have reblogged for a long time.

THIS NEEDS TO BE BOLDED

DO NOT MAKE IT ABOUT YOU

DO NOT MAKE IT ABOUT YOU

DO NOT MAKE IT ABOUT YOU

There are things in these sources that directly conflict with professional training I’ve received in this subject. 

The big one is whatever you should NOT be ambiguous about what you’re asking. Ask them whether they are thinking about suicide or killing themselves. Don’t ask them about them ‘hurting themselves’ or ‘giving up’ The last thing you want to do is be vague in a situation like this. A person may not view suicide as a process of ‘hurting themselves’ due to the fact that they are ending their suffering.

Also, a HUGE part of suicide intervention which is not mentioned at all here and is almost warned against in the last image is you should ALWAYS ask them WHY. You cannot offer help or support to a person if you have no idea why they are contemplating suicide. You can’t reassure someone that it’s going to get better unless you know what is wrong in the first place.

And to be perfectly honest a lot of time these people have never had the chance to explain why they’re feeling like this. Because people’s automatic assumption is to tell them everything is going to be fine and will get better and leave it at that. Always ask a person why they want to kill themselves, always. Don’t worry about what this post says about asking someone to ‘justify’ their feelings, because people in this position need to feel validated, they need to feel like someone is listening and not just blindly telling them that things will get better when they have no idea what is wrong in the first place.

— 8 months ago with 207322 notes
Hyperbole and a Half: Adventures in Depression →

invisibledisabilities:

Allie Brosh’s amazing webcomic about Depression. Its super relatable.

— 8 months ago with 12 notes
not everyone with an eating disorder:is skinny
not everyone with an eating disorder:goes to hospital
not everyone with an eating disorder:gets diagnosed
not everyone with an eating disorder:is anorexic
not everyone with an eating disorder:goes to therapy
not everyone with an eating disorder:exercises
not everyone with an eating disorder:makes themselves sick
not everyone with an eating disorder:doesn't eat
not everyone with an eating disorder:calorie counts
not everyone with an eating disorder:only eats healthy foods
not everyone with an eating disorder:has fear foods
not everyone with an eating disorder:want to lose weight
not everyone with an eating disorder:is obsessed with being skinny
not everyone with an eating disorder:cries in front of food
— 9 months ago with 109404 notes

stufftheysaytodepressedpeople:

TW: Ableism

I’m an avid reader of fanfiction, and it’s sad that people slap various neurologies onto their OCs like there was no tomorrow. The writers often get the symptoms wrong and treat mental health problems like adornments.

Being the good person I try to be, I send them critiques telling them they’re reinforcing harmful stigmas, and all I get in response is whiny, unwarranted self importance all saying the same thing ultimately: “Your rights end where my creative license begins and I care more about my work than how it affects you and the crazies. Shut up.”

It’s disheartening through and through, as there are times when I wonder why I even bother. Teaching people about mental health shouldn’t be limited to classrooms or dispelling myths on tv. The stigmas are everywhere, even in some of the books I read, in the newspapers, in circles of friends joking about schizophrenia, in conversations with my family members too. It’s overwhelming, but I’m not going down easy.

What I do isn’t limited to critiquing people, I also write stories where depressed people are three dimensional and don’t fit into the tiny box of what society perceives to be the “true” sufferers. I try as hard as I can to make them sympathetic too.

I don’t believe sympathy in itself is a weakness. At its best, it can motivate people to make the world a better place, and boy do we need that right now. We need to spread knowledge too, it’s very important that people know why we think the way we do and understand us a little better.

I’m only a speck in the population, but I’m trying the best I can using the methods I know best.

— 9 months ago with 42 notes
everythingistigers:

This is such a great idea! Anyone have any ideas for adapting this to depression, anxiety or other illnesses? What would you put on your list?

everythingistigers:

This is such a great idea! Anyone have any ideas for adapting this to depression, anxiety or other illnesses? What would you put on your list?

(Source: srslyrecover-ed, via edrecoveryprobs)

— 9 months ago with 2678 notes